Monday, April 6, 2009

That's My World!--Filley Stone Barn







Filley’s Stone Barn
Filley's stone barn -- best known feature of the area -- was built, in part, because of the need for employment during the terrible grasshopper plague and drought that struck in the early 1870s. The project kept many settlers from losing their land. Built into a hillside, the lower level had stalls for 60 animals. The three-inch plank that covered the main floor was caulked with oakum (made from hemp) and covered with melted pitch to be water-tight for 30 additional stalls. The loft held 100 tons of hay. Completed in late November, a stone inscribed "Built By Elijah Filley - AD 1874" was set above the west door, and a grand barn dance was attended by everyone in the community.

The barn, placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, was described as the largest limestone structure presently known, and one of the most magnificent barns in the state. The cost of restoration through grants and by the Gage County Historical Society was many times the original cost of the building. It is now available for numerous activities and hopefully will stand as a land mark for another 100 years or so.


Once in awhile you encounter an informational site and you wonder why you never found it before. Such is the site that the information about Filley’s Stone Barn is quoted from. The site isNebraska…Our Towns. It has, among other things, historical information about six hundred cities and towns in Nebraska.

Boy am I going to bore everyone to tears now! giggle

Take a tour around the world via your computer by visiting That's My World!

14 comments:

erin said...

what a great post...love that the barn was recognized as a national historic site...and the history behind it is amazing.
thank you for sharing this with us.

Louise said...

This isn't boring at all. That is an incredible structure!

Mojo said...

Wow. That? Is some barn! Marvelous photos of it too.

Mary Elizabeth said...

Interesting!
Thanks for sharing. Have a wonderful week.
Mary Elizabeth Now and Then.

Carver said...

What a beautiful barn. I enjoyed learning about it.

Sylvia K said...

Great post and not boring at all! Fascinating info and a beautiful old barn! Wow!

Martha said...

It is nice that they restored that, it is quite a structure. Thanks for sharing.

Guy D said...

Wow what a cool barn, thanks for the info, I enjoyed your post again this week.

Have a great week!
Guy
Regina In Pictures

SandyCarlson said...

Way cool thing. That's a great image, and I enjoyed the story.

Arija said...

Ilove old barns, and this is a particularly beautiful one. It veritably sings of times of yore and building for the future with endurable materials, not with a view of it only lasting untir we move to a retirement village or nursing home. It speaks f traditions of durability brought from 'the old counry' and an expectation of many generations tilling one particular piece of land. How values have changed.

Kathiesbirds said...

Not boring! So interesting and beautiful. I love the architecture of this barn. How true it is; they don't make them like they use to!

Denise said...

Wonderful post, most definitely not boring, I enjoyed it tremendously and thank you for sharing it. Great photos!

byrningbunny said...

I love boring stuff like this! Great post.

Kris said...

What a beautiful barn! I invite you to see our stone barn in Oconto Cty, Wisconsin.

www.townofchase.org